brisbane

Easy ways to cook well, eat well and have fun doing it

Friends cooking together the veagetarian dinner in kitchen

An interesting revelation has come to come me lately. I always had this preconception that as a chef just because I know how to cook I must know how to eat. Let me explain my logic here – when you can cook and anything and enjoy cooking surely you must only eat the very best and cook the very best? Well, yes and no. Yes I do love cooking delicious and beautiful meals but do I always choose them? No. The usual excuses come into play here. Not enough time to cook when I get home from work, not bothered cooking once again or just plain sick of the sight of food and having to decide what to cook for dinner.

Meal plans, frozen meals, ready meals I hear you exclaim! I totally get the logic of this but there is also the friend that goes hand in hand with excuses – habit. It was never a habit of mine to make and freeze meals. It has never been a habit of mine to right a menu for the week. So what do you do when you are not eating well and don’t know where to start.

Learn what foods work for you and your body

  1. What is eating well and what does it mean to you?

Everyone has their definitions of eating well. For some it’s a calorie controlled meal plan, for others it’s a vegetarian diet, other’s it paleo. At the heart of eating well for me is choosing certain non-negotiable items:

  • Fresh fruit and vegetables that are in season – buying seasonal and local means that not only are you getting the best version of your produce, you are also buying at the best value. Fruits and vegetables have seasons for a reason – this is when they grow best. When fruits are in season they are priced to match – there may be a glut from ideal weather so they are able to be sold off at a great price.
  • Quality meat, fish and poultry. If you choose to eat animal products ensure they are the best quality you can afford. To me respecting the animal source is paramount – free range or organic where possible and from reputable sources.
  • Full fat everything – now I know this seems in opposition to eating well but by eating full fat you aren’t compromising on flavour which can be compensated with added sugar or salt in low fat products. Fat satiates whereas sugar can trick your mind into thinking it hasn’t eaten as many calories as it has. Instead of having a small spoon of mayo you may find yourself using 3-4 to create the desired taste.
  • Make from scratch where you can – I am all for eating the foods you enjoy. Biscuits, cakes and muffins are all ok but I prefer that they be made from scratch. Packet mixes are usually just your dried ingredients plus stabilisers and emulsifiers added in. When you make your own foods you can adjust to taste and ensure the ingredients you love are in them. Baking muffins with oats and whole fruits makes for a sweet treat with added nutrients, cakes that can be made grain free without compromising flavour are possible. The same applies to dressings, sauces and marinades. Instead of just buying a sugar syrup with spices you can make robust and interesting combinations that suit your tastes.

Ok so now we have my rules for eating well. What is the next step?

schedule

  1. Create the habit and pay attention to your schedule.

There is no point planning a 7 day meal plan if you know you will be out or working for 3 of those days. Just the same as buying items that will go off quickly if you don’t use them with a plan. Plan for last minute catch-ups, outings or late shifts and what you can do with the food in your fridge if you don’t get to it straight away. Having your vegetables chopped ready for the week can mean that if you find yourself not home for dinner two nights in a row you can just blanch (steam/boil then cool in ice water) them for 2 minutes and then freeze to use when you can. The same applies to fruits. Having them diced up can make them more appealing to grab and if you find you’re just not getting to them pop them in the freezer for baking or smoothies.

 

frustrated cooking

  1. Explore your excuses and reluctance.

The reasons we don’t eat well, move our bodies or take care of ourselves can be varied and many. Family habits, projections and expectations can all create stories in our heads as to why we can’t, won’t, shouldn’t, it’s too hard. So how do we create new positive habits and let go of the stories? Start to question them – Are they yours? Have you been listening to other people’s stories? Are you repeating habits of family members? Are you projecting ideas onto yourself from what you think is required? All these stories and ideas can lock yourself into thinking nothing can change or will change. By exploring limiting beliefs you can choose new ways of being. Being in allowance of what works for you can be the first step in choosing different. Instead of judging the choices you have made to this point you can allow yourself to choose something new.

I am the first to admit that my clothes have gotten considerably tighter due to my excuses. I wasn’t willing to look at the changes in my lifestyle and the effects they would have. I went from working full time as a chef on my feet all day and doing outdoor activities 3-4 times a week to working part time and sporting a foot injury that dramatically reduced my activity levels. All of this can be compensated for but there needs to be no excuses and stories. If I had paid attention to my body, my eating plans and movement I would have identified the need to adjust my lifestyle. Notice I don’t say “go on a diet” or “exercise more”.

It is important to care for yourself without creating unrealistic goals and ideas that just serve to cement us in place versus allowing us to move forward. As the majority of my clothes got tighter I finally stopped, sat down and asked myself some questions. What has changed? What is different? Where am I not paying attention to my body and its care? This is where I came to realise I was eating energy dense foods in quantities I didn’t require. On days when you are moving around a lot and being very active more food may be required. Low key days at home may see you eating less. Or maybe neither of these apply to you but for me this reflection was key to getting my health and well being back on track.

Previous to my foot injury I was easily active. I enjoyed being outdoors and being active. The pain and frustration of my injury had my become all or nothing. Either I could be active or I wasn’t bothered. You can see how this isn’t conducive to good health and well being. So what could I have chosen?

  • Low impact movement: Yoga, pilates, boxing without the running components, using a small trampoline, swimming, bike riding, all these activities are low impact on my feet and could assist in keeping my body moving, vital and healthy
  • Planning meals: Having favourite recipes and meal ideas I know I enjoy and can create easily can take away the what to cook for dinner frustration
  • Proper rehabilitation of the muscles: This was the biggest issue. I refused to see a doctor or podiatrist for my foot pain for months. Not days or weeks, months. Even then I was reluctant to change my work shoes, do the rehabilitation of the muscles and seek other opinions and options. I didn’t want to admit that my body had changed and what may have been a minor issue I allowed to become a major one.
  • Checking in: Instead of just assuming that everything was too hard or too painful I could have checked in daily with what movements were comfortable for that day. Your body is ever changing and ever moving. Some days we are flexible and supple, some days we might be a little stiff and sore but it is changeable with some care and attention

So what did I choose? Only some of the above sometimes. As mentioned, the pain and frustration of my injury had me shutting down any awareness of the change required. I didn’t want to know what I could do I just wanted to mourn what I was no longer capable of. Sound familiar?

So what now?

time to change

  1. The time has come

For me now the time has come to start choosing different and enjoying my body, eating and movement once more. I starting seeing a different chiropractor, I went back to the podiatrist and said my orthotics weren’t working, I saw a physio to release the muscles and it worked. My feet are actually feeling better. I was also unsure that my hormones were in check so I went to a doctor. There is no shame in asking questions of health professionals. Sometimes they may have a key piece of information that you require. Of course no one knows your body like you do but if you don’t ask you can’t change anything.

It can take time to change habits as well. Some may disappear just by acknowledging them and some may take a little more processing but just being willing to choose is the first step.

I am excited at the new changes I know will be possible for me and my body and if you would like some further advice on eating well, cooking delicious foods or choosing supportive and fun movements and activities for your body please feel free to be in touch. I love to share my experience and offer ideas and support for you and your body. If you would like a more in-depth program I have fantastic packages available. Let me know what’s cooking in your kitchen and what has helped you create fabulous health and wellbeing J

Undercover Chef Tip – Having your cake and cutting it too

Undercover chef tip - Cut the cake

 

Ever starting cutting up a beautiful birthday cake and found by the third slice it looks a little less than beautiful? So what to do? 

An easy solution is to warm up the knife in hot water to allow it to cut through the icing cleanly. 

So how do you warm up the knife easily? Just place some hot water in a measuring jug, dip the knife in for a few seconds, slice through with ease, wipe off the knife with paper towel, re-dip and continue to cut, repeating the dip and wipe with each slice. 

The result? Lovely clean slices that do justice to the cake. Woohoo. 

 

We all scream for ice-cream

Summer days are meant for ice-cream. Cool taste sensations and flavours that delight the tongue, what could be more exciting?

Sometimes though, store bought ice-cream can reveal a whole lot of interesting additives, flavours, extenders (water, vegetable shortening, wheat starch) which I prefer to leave on the shelves, not in my stomach. So how you get your ice-cream fix without the stress? The joy that is no-churn ice-cream!

That’s right, no longer do you need to pull your mix out of the freezer and bend your beaters (a lesson I learnt all too well…use the heavy duty paddle next time Luisa…). With this recipe you just mix, whip, fold and freeze. Easy. I will include the traditional recipe as well if you do own a churner as these are also fabulous and a churner does make life a lot easier when creating fantastic ice-cream creations!

So why use sweetened condensed milk in these recipes? The ingredients of condensed milk are just milk, milk solids and sugar. When making traditional ice-cream you use milk, cream, sugar and eggs so this is great for those with egg allergies and there are no thickeners, additives, colours or preservatives. The condensed milk stabilises the ice-cream mix the way eggs do in the traditional recipes allowing you to have the same smooth texture without the fuss. The only difference for me was it is quite rich so a couple of spoons will do.

When creating your own mix, don’t be afraid to get creative with flavours for exciting combinations. Here are some of my favourites:

Hazlenut and chocolate – add a generous scoop of nutella to the mix. If making no churn stir into the condensed milk, if making custard add to the milk and cream mix

White chocolate and passionfruit – for no churn add 100g melted white chocolate and 100ml of passionfruit puree. For the churn, double the amount and add the chocolate to the milk when heating and passionfruit at end.

Strawberry – to make puree blend 150g strawberries with 2 tbsp of icing sugar and strain – add to mix

Malt – for the no churn dissolve 2 tbsp malt in 5tbsp of the pure cream warmed and add to the condensed milk. For the churned add the malt powder to the milk and cream mix when heating

Stay tuned for further recipes teaching you how to make praline mix in’s, fun serving ideas and home made toppings. Yum!

So without further ado, the no-churn ice-cream:

No Churn Vanilla Ice-Cream

Ingredients
  1. 1 can condensed milk (340g)
  2. 300ml pure cream
  3. Splash of vanilla essence
Instructions
  1. Combine vanilla and condensed milk
  2. Whip cream to soft peaks
  3. Fold through cream and milk mixture softly until well combined

And if you’d like to churn your own vanilla ice-cream?

Vanilla Ice-Cream

Ingredients
  1. 560ml cream
  2. 188ml milk
  3. 210g sugar
  4. 6 egg yolks
  5. 1 vanilla pod
Instructions
  1. Bring the cream, milk, vanilla and half of the sugar to a simmer
  2. Whisk the yolks with the remaining sugar until light and fluffy
  3. Mix through the cream and milk with the yolks
  4. Place back on stove in clean pot over low heat and stir until mixture thickens
  5. Strain and allow to cool and chill
  6. Place into churner and follow your machines instructions
Cooking out custard can be a bit tricky so here are some troubleshooting tips
  1. 1. It looks like scrambled eggs – your stove was too hot and the egg yolks cooked too quickly. Never fear, the solution is to allow the mix to cool a little, then add it to a blender and whiz until smooth and strain through a fine sieve. Make sure the mixture is cooled before blending otherwise it can overflow and cause burns
  2. 2. It looks watery and you’ve been stirring for quite a long time – you may need to increase the heat of your stove – a low to medium heat works well for induction and electric, gas should work quickly on low
  3. 3. I need to churn the ice-cream in a hurry – To cool the custard quickly, place the bowl of custard over another bowl filled with ice and water and stir the custard mix until cooled and churn

The knives are out – how to choose a kitchen knife that works for you

 a chef's hands with creaning fish | description: a chef's hands with creaning fish | location: Tokyo Japan | location: Tokyo Japan | description: a chef's hands with creaning fish | description: a chef's hands with creaning fish | location: Tokyo Japan | location: Tokyo Japan knife with food a knife and food

Besides what is is my favourite food to cook, what type of knife do I use is another question I am often asked. 

So how do you know what type of knife to invest in, what to look for and where to save your dollars? 

Let’s start with some basic points to consider:

1. What is the knife for and how often will you use it?

Knives whose job entails boning, filleting or cleaving may not be used very often unless they are a tool of the trade. Even as a chef I don’t often bone or fillet as the cuts we that come in in certain establishments sometimes don’t require too much further preparation. In other jobs though I might have to bone quails, fillet some fish and break down some chickens but for the most part the knife I use the most is my general chef knife.

So what is a chef knife exactly? It is usually a 20cm blade knife with a larger heel and fine point for chopping, dicing, slicing. It is almost an extension of a chef’s hand and is their best friend. 

For home cooks? This can be the weapon of choice when whipping up a fabulous meal. Having a comfortable, sharp, chef’s knife can make short work of hard task’s.

So for the knives you use most often it is worth the investment versus the little used knives that you can save your pennies on. 

knives

2. Is the handle comfortable to hold?

If you’re going to be holding the knife and chopping a storm the handle has to be comfortable. So how do you know? Grip it as if you were going to chop on a board and get a feel for it. Does it fit comfortably in your hand? What may fit well for someone else may not work for you. 

hand with knife

3. Is it the right weight for you?

I prefer somewhat lighter knives as after a long day chopping more weight can create unnecessary strain. But if a knife is too light it can make heavy duty chopping such as through root vegetables or meat a strain. Find the right balance and you’ll be chopping with ease in no time.

knife holding

4. What is the handle made of?

Quality knives either consist of one piece of steel from blade to handle or heavy duty plastic. The most important thing to consider with the handle is the ease of cleaning i.e one piece of steel or clean plastic handle as opposed to wood that can be porous and harbour germs. Quality knives also have secure joins between knife and handle that won’t crack or break which can cause injury if they break. 

knife handles

5. What is the blade made of?

Most modern knives are made of stainless steel with the better quality ones made of a higher grade composition. Some older knives may be made of carbon steel which is a great metal but is prone to rusting thus is often not found in many commercial knives as vigilance is required to prevent the rust. 

knife blade

6. What is the blade edge like?

A quality knife will have a blade edge from tip to hilt. Cheap knives will feature a thick edge that doesn’t extend to the hilt which can make it useless for chopping carrots and other harder vegetables. A fine edge will allow for precision cutting wheres a thick edge makes for clunky, difficult cutting. 

knife edge

 

7. Can you keep it sharp?

If you are going to invest in a quality knife make sure you can keep it sharp to prong its use. This is where you either need to also invest in a quality knife steel and stone or a quality sharpener. Cheap sharpeners will just shave too much of the blade off at too big an angle. A knife steel keeps an edge sharp whilst a stone hones the edge when it becomes too dull. Both are a great addition to your tool kit to keep your knives if top shape. 

knife steel

 

So taking this into consideration the short of it all is:

– Look for a comfortable knife that has a fine even blade, quality plastic or steel handle and is made of quality stainless steel. 

– Spend your money on the knives you use the most

– Invest in a knife steel and learn how to use it to keep your knives honed and sharp

 

 

 

 

 

Putting the Merry in your Christmas

Gift certificate template general

Stuck for last minute Christmas idea? Know someone that loves to cook or you wish they did? Never fear, I offer gift vouchers that can be purchased as either a dollar amount ($50 etc) or class bookings ($150+) which you can provide as either valid for one two hours class or speak to me and we can create a specific class i.e Italian, Cooking with Herbs, Dessert etc

How do you organise a voucher? Just email me at [email protected], I can invoice you for a credit card payment or direct debit and the gift voucher will be in your inbox within 24 hours. How does it get any better than that? 😀 If you’d like to chat about options just gie me a call on 0423 450 363 and we can discuss your options.

Wishing everyone a Happy Holiday season and all the best for the New Year 

 

 

 

Keeping it cool and classy with Champagne Pops

Hello Sunshine! You could be forgiven for thinking it’s Summer all year round here in Queensland with the weather at the moment. So what adult treat can you whip up to keep it cool and classy? Champagne pops of course!

Now I am not suggesting you have to use Champagne for this recipe, good quality sparkling wine works great too. I say good quality as you will be able to taste the wine with the pops so any corked or old wines can ruin the light fruity taste of the pops. 

So what’s involved? It’s pretty simple really – all you need is some sparkling wine or champagne, fruit puree or juice and mint.

Now I know you’ll love these popsicles, it will be the most sophisticated version of a zooper dooper you’ve ever seen! ;D Enjoy!

 

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Undercover Chef Tip – Saving the Herbs

Fresh herbs are great when you are making a salad or cooking and sprinkling them in. But what do you do with them when no further recipe ideas call for them later in the week? A great way to preserve herbs is to freeze them in olive oil or stock for later use. You can just pop a stock cube into a casserole, stew or curry and your herby burst of flavour will cook into the mix.

Defrost the olive oil frozen herbs for dressings or stir into pan when cooking onions and garlic for a recipe. Not only do you get to use up your herbs but you then have some stock and oil ready to go when you need it.

Sad wilted bunches of leftover herbs in the crisper be gone. You’re welcome.

Ask Luisa – have a cooking question? Just Ask!

Apologies for the bad ghost busters reference, it almost had to be done. The inspiration for this blog is thanks for a lovely friend asking about what to cook for dinner based on the ingredients she had. I realised that this is not uncommon for me as I have family often calling for a quick chef questions – i.e. How long should this take to cook? When would I know if this is ready? What cut of meat would suit this? And my favourite, It has turned a funny colour but smells ok, should I cook it?

I love these sorts of questions. It stimulates my cooking brain and allows me to delve into my knowledge to produce my version of what I would do in these circumstances. Just as I call my builder brother for advice on what to do when my shower screen comes off or a tap is leaking, so too do I give the cooking solutions.

So what was the prompt for the initial cooking question? Well J and I have been taking turns making dinner for each other each Monday and I had whipped up the fresh pasta with tomatoes and olives and other goodies as found in my cooking for a crowd blog. J wanted to replicate a similar dinner with a slight variation on ingredients that she either had on hand or had picked up from the supermarket.

My Advice?

1. Don’t bother with the bottled tomato sauce – if you have delicious fresh tomatoes on hand, don’t bother with bottled sauces – whilst they can seem like an easy and simple option they totally kill the freshness of the other ingredients

2. Forget the carrot – I only use carrot and celery when making bolognaise – i saute this off before adding the mince and allow it to cook out. If you’re not using mince, don’t bother with carrot – it won’t add anything

3. Grill the eggplant and zucchini – pan fried eggplant can be a bit, well blah. To me the smokiness of a bbq or even a grill caramelising it brings out the sweetness and subtlety of it. Same with the zucchini. Technically they are fruits so applying that sort of heat allows for a lovely golden caramel which creates gorgeous flavours. I would do the same when making a vegetable lasagna instead of just layering the raw vegetables.

4.  Use the oil from the semi dried tomatoes to coat the vegetables before grilling if you’d like some extra herby punch. I always keep those sorts of oils at they have infused with the tomato and generally have a herb mix in them so creates all sorts of delicious.

5. Saute the onion and add the tomato – by caramelising the onion and adding the tomato you get that brilliant sweetness and tartness together. Good balance means you don’t need to add sugar as some sauce recipes do. Allow the tomato to saute a little and bring out it’s own juices. Help it along a little with some water and you have a fresh yummy sauce.

6. To finish, add the grill vegetables to the tomato mix, stir in the olives and semi-dried tomatoes, top with torn up bocconcini and fresh basil if on hand. Buon appetito!

So who do you call when you don’t have a chef as your sister/friend/partner? Well, me. I am more than happy to answer any and all cooking queries be it simple or complex. If I don’t know the answer then I will try and find out for you. After all I have many chef friends on call too so if I can’t help, I’ll test their skills to see if they can.

So how can you enlist my help? Just ask: on my facebook page or email me at [email protected]

What sort of questions can I answer? Hopefully anything. If you have baked a cake that hasn’t quite worked let me know what ingredients you used, the pan size and oven temp and we can nut it out. Something too salty, sweet or spicy? Check the forum for reference material.

Not sure what to do for dinner with what you bought? Either check my recipes page for inspiration or upload a pic of the ingredients to the facebook page or email me, I’ll give you a recipe if you’ll let me share the yummy finished product. How easy right?

So what’s the catch? I hear you say. None at all. I love to share my foodie knowledge and stretch my chef brain. If you’d like me to come to you and hash out a variety of recipes or recreate some of your more epic disasters to see where you went wrong then we can arrange for a lesson at cost. But the simple questions and advice? Happy to help.

Love to enlist my help with some cooking lessons? Check out my services page to see if we can find a match to fit.

Happy cooking!

The cheek of it all! – Morrocan style beef cheeks

The saying goes ask and you shall receive. My sister in law asked for beef cheeks and she received them – slow cooked with Moroccan style spices until fork tender and served with a side of roast cauliflower and chickpea salad. Clearly she knew who to ask! B;D

Braised meats are a delicious and simple way to create family favourite meals. Whilst they require time to cook, they are not in fact time consuming to prepare. After sealing the meat and creating the liquid for the beef to cook in, beef cheeks are a great meal that can be left to cook whilst you go about your day.

I have cooked beef cheeks a variety of ways over the years they have come back into vogue – from a carmelised sticky deliciousness as a result of being braised in stout beer to a lighter red wine braise to my version with the Moroccan style spices.

Beef cheeks become a beautiful braised meal when left to stew in their own juices – jokes aside, they do really benefit from a long slow cook as the muscle itself is quite tight and when braised whole keep their shape quite well for presentation. You can also use the cooked cheeks for a ravioli or cannelloni filling – just fork shred the tender meat, mix through some leftover braising liquid to moisten and stuff your cannelloni shells or fold into your silky pasta dough. Easy and delicious. If you’re not up to filling your pasta, just fork shred the beef, add some liquid as before and toss through some pappadelle pasta for a lovely ragu style sauce. Topped with some shaved pecorino (a hard goat’s cheese similar in style to Parmesan) it’s definitely a winner for entertaining guests or just enjoying at home.

The accompanying salad was inspired by some very delicious cauliflower combinations I have discovered in cafe’s and health food shops recently. I must admit cauliflower was a vegetable I studiously avoided for much of my adult life. As a child I absolutely hated it. No matter if mum tried to dress it up with creamy sauce and golden melted cheese – underneath was still the dreaded cauliflower florets. What I realised was I really don’t like boiled cauliflower unless it is then pureed into a soup. I tried cauliflower as an adult again in said salads and found myself really enjoying it. It was because the cauliflower was only lightly cooked and still had some crunch. Then I discovered roast cauliflower. Now we were talking. I didn’t assume this could be done – roast a vegetable that is usally steamed or boiled?! But you can and let me assure you, it is delicious.

You can coat the florets with some olive oil and salt and pepper to ensure a nice even golden colour and if you like a bit of spice, add some chilli powder to the salt blend before sprinkling on. The cauliflower takes about 30 mins at 170 degrees to cook to a tender but still firm texture. I popped some baby tomatoes I had rolling around the fridge in and a salad was born.

Don’t be afraid to mix and match salad ingredients to suit your tastebuds either. I added chickpeas, spinach, coriander and flaked almonds to the mix. The dressing? A lovely avocado dressing I found in the local fruit shop – something a bit different to the usual but you could easily whisk up some orange juice, red wine vinegar, olive oil and seasoning for this combo.The dressing just caught my eye so I decided to go with it!

Feel free to experiment and let me know how you you went with your own recipe variations and happy cooking!

 

 

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Undercover Chef Tip – Keeping it Above Board

Wobbly chopping boards – the bane and danger of any kitchen be it household or commercial. Nothing is worse than trying to run your knife over some herbs and the board slips and slides. Or how about when you are trying to dice some meat for a casserole and each slice of the blade sends the board this way and that? Solution -wet a cloth or some paper towel, sit your board on top and chop away! Never risk cutting your fingers again